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In this response to the Justice Select Committee’s inquiry into the role of adult custodial remand, we urge the government to reduce the rising level of remand through the urgent scaling-up of Bail Information Services in courts and prisons. We also recommend the government end the disproportionate use of remand for Black, Asian and minority ethnic women and divert resources set aside for prison expansion to community-based support services, such as Women’s Centres.

In this response to the Justice Select Committee, we recommend that the four overarching principles of the Victims’ Code set out in the Bill be expanded to reflect all 12 entitlements in the current Code. Furthermore, agencies should have a statutory duty to comply with the Code’s entitlements, and the Victims’ Commissioner’s powers should be strengthened to provide national oversight of the operation of the Code.

We emphasise that victims should have a statutory entitlement to be informed about restorative justice (RJ) and how to access RJ, and a statutory right to be automatically referred to an RJ service. We urge the government to reintroduce a national RJ action plan, which sets out how access, awareness and capacity will be improved within the criminal justice system. The government should publish its annual progress against this action plan, and a new plan should be developed and laid before Parliament at least every five years.

In this response to the Children’s Commissioner’s call for evidence for the Family Review, we specifically focus on how the Children’s Commissioner can improve the outcomes of children who are experiencing parental and family imprisonment. We call on the Children’s Commissioner to explicitly promote and protect the rights of these children, for a statutory process to be introduced to identify these children, and for family support services for those in prison and children and families in the community to have adequate and sustainable funding.

In this response to the Home Affairs Select Committee’s inquiry into drugs, we recommend the government introduce a new, health-based legislative framework for drug use. This framework should be based on the findings of an independent review on the potential for licensing, decriminalisation, legalisation, regulation and taxation of drugs in England and Wales.

We also recommend the expansion of drug diversion schemes, drug courts and Community Sentence Treatment Requirements, as well as evidence-based harm reduction measures, such as Overdose Prevention Centres (OPCs) and drug checking services, in order to make national progress on our drug policy.

In this response to the Prisons Strategy White Paper, we call on the government to reduce the prison population and divert its investment for new prison building into improving the existing prison estate. We also set out measures to better support people in or leaving prison with employment, family ties and resettlement.

In this response to the government’s consultation on a new Victims’ Bill, we set out measures to increase access to restorative justice; improve support for people in prison who have been victims of crime; improve specialist services for children, young adults and Black, Asian and minority ethnic people who have been victims of crime; and to enhance complaints processes.

In this response to Phase Two of the Strategic Review of Policing, the CJA discusses trust and confidence in policing, the need for improved internal and external scrutiny around the use of police powers,  improving diversity in the police force, and what the future of policing might look like.

In this response to an inquiry from the Education Select Committee, the CJA draws on discussions with members to set out how education within prisons could be improved, and how individuals in prison could be better prepared for work after their release.

Serious Violence Reduction Orders (SVROs) will give the police the power to stop and search people who have previously been convicted of carrying a knife. The CJA strongly opposes the implementation of SVROs, which will not address the underlying reasons for reoffending and knife carrying, instead disrupting a person’s rehabilitative journey by encouraging officers to continuously stop and search them.

In this response to the Ministry of Justice’s consultation on Strengthening the Independent Scrutiny Bodies through Legislation, the CJA discusses how scrutiny bodies such as the Prison and Probation Ombudsman, Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Prisons and Independent Monitoring Boards could be strengthened. The CJA also considers the advantages and disadvantages of England and Wales adopting the ‘Scottish Model’, where scrutiny is merged under one body.

In this submission to the Home Affairs Select Committee consultation on ‘The Macpherson Report: Twenty one years on’, we discuss the continued ethnic and racial disproportionality in the use of police powers. In the response, we focus on stop and search, the use of police force, disproportionate use of COVID-19 powers, the lack of independent scrutiny of policing, the lack of BAME representation in police forces, and more.

The CJA has responded to the Consultation on Improving the Victims’ Code. In our response, we call for a right for victims to be referred to a Restorative Justice service.

The CJA’s response to the Justice Select Committee’s inquiry on the ageing prison population.

This response highlights the CJA’s concern that that the current balance of focus is still tipped towards the reactionary identification and targeting of specific ‘high risk individuals’ rather than implementing clear long-term prevention strategies to address the root causes of serious violence.

Our response to the Ministry of Justice’s consultation on probation highlights the need to build of positive and meaningful relationships between probation officers and the people they work with and increase confidence in community sentences.

Our response to the Ministry of Justice and Home Office consultation on the response to domestic abuse considers best practice for perpetrators and victims, including victims who go on to offend.

Our response to MOPAC’s consultation on public access and engagement highlights the need for greater and more authentic engagement with young BAME people in London.

The CJA response to the Sentencing Council’s bladed articles and offensive weapons guidelines consultation

Our response welcomes the broadening of factors that should be taken into account when considering the welfare of a young person but emphasises that sentencers should also consider the fact that many young people are also themselves victims of crimes.

Our consultation response to the Sentencing Council’s draft guidelines on early guilty pleas highlights our concerns that the proposed changes will not benefit enough victims and witnesses and it could unnecessarily increase the prison population.